French Sculpture Census

photo credit : Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk
artist © : public domain

DALOU, Aimé-Jules
Paris 1838 - Paris 1902

Angelino Cartioni, Tête de jeune garçon (Portrait du fils d'Angelo Cartioni)
Angelino Cartioni (Portrait of the Son of Angelo Cartioni)

c. 1877-1878
bronze

head
16 3/4 x 8 x 8 1/2

Acc. No. : 71.2065
Credit Line : Gift of Walter P. Chrysler

Norfolk, Virginia, Chrysler Museum of Art

www.chrysler.org

Provenance

  • 1971, Gift of Walter P. Chrysler

Bibliography

  • Museum's website, 30 March 2015
  • 2013 Simier et Kisiel
    Amélie Simier, assistée de Marine Kisiel, Jules Dalou, le sculpteur de la République. Catalogue des sculptures de Jules Dalou conservées au Petit Palais, Paris, Petit Palais - Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, 2013, p. 364 (vers 1877-1878)

Exhibition

  • 2008 Norfolk
    Reopening of the Joan P. Brock Galleries, Norfolk, Chrysler Museum of Art, Opening in March of 2008

Related Works

It is here the bronze edition of the terracotta study for the angel in the Monument to the deceased grand-children of Queen Victoria, Paris, Musée du Petit Palais, PPS00278.

Comment



Museum's website, Object Label, 30 March 2015:
In 1878 Queen Victoria commissioned Dalou to create a memorial sculpture for her dead grandchildren for the Royal Chapel at Windsor Castle. Dalou made a number of smaller figure studies for that large bronze monument, several of which he then issued as independent works of art. Among the most poignant of these is his Head of a Boy, which the artist made while perfecting his design for the angel who cradles Victoria's deceased grandchildren in his arms. The young son of Dalou's London assistant, Angelino Cartioni served as his model. Though Dalou worked to build his reputation in Paris, his career first blossomed in London, where he fled for a time to escape the political reprisals that befell other radical supporters of the Paris Commune at the end of the Franco-Prussian War (1871). He eventually became one of the most productive and successful sculptors working in France. His creations ranged from intimate studies such as the Chrysler's Head of a Boy to mammoth public monuments like The Triumph of the Republic (Place de la Nation, Paris).