French Sculpture Census

STORRS, John
Chicago, Illinois 1885 - Mer, Loir-et-Cher 1956
Gender: M
artist ©: Fair Use (Section 107, Copyright Act, 1976)

STORRS, John (John Bradley).
See Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Storrs (accessed 11 December 2015).
Lives and works between France and USA from 1911 to his death in 1956.
Nasher Sculpture Center's website, 30 March 2010:
During the twenties and thirties Storrs divided his time between France and the United States, having bought a château in Mer, close to Orléans, in 1921 and having become one of the few American artists of the period to attain a truly international reputation. In the twenties his work appeared in exhibitions in Paris at the Galerie Briant Robert, Musée du Jeu de Paume, Galerie Durand-Ruel, Galerie Charpentier, and at Léonce Rosenberg's gallery, and in 1926 Storrs sold a sculpture entitled Forms in Space to the French government. Closely tied in spirit and form to the exciting emergence in America of a new, high-rise architecture, and also to certain native-American traditions of sculpture and decoration, Storrs's work is linked equally to the machine aesthetic of European artists such as Fernand Léger and Amédée Ozenfant, to Cubist stylistic conventions, and to the sleek geometric patterns of Art Deco. This successful fusing of traditions gave his art a strength and flavor that found support on both sides of the Atlantic.
Storrs's use of tall, narrow, simplified shafts bound in architectural compositions first occurred about 1920 in drawings and works such as the now lost Forms in Space, No. 1, a large stone sculpture from 1920-23. An apparently coincidental relationship exists with sculptures by certain Russian and Dutch artists of the same period, including Kasimir Malevich and Georges Vantongerloo, although in comparison Storrs's work retains a slightly precious quality owing to his carefully finished surfaces, penchant for fine materials (polished metals, a variety of stones), and consistent decorative touches. While some of his towers verge on pure abstraction, others like the Nasher's sculpture are more literal in evoking modern skyscrapers.
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24 Results Found
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