French Sculpture Census

photo credit : photo by Smallbones, 2011, commons.wikimedia.org
artist © : public domain

FREMIET, Emmanuel
Paris 1824 - Paris 1910

Maker: Thiébaut

Jeanne d'Arc
Joan of Arc

1889
gilded bronze, on granite base

equestrian statue(tte)
H. 15' (base 8'4")

Credit Line : The City of Philadelphia, outdoor sculpture

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Outdoor sculpture

Provenance

  • Initiated by the City of Philadelphia, the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art), and the French Centennial Committee.
  • Owned by the City of Philadelphia.
  • 1889 [1888?], members of the French community in Philadelphia sought the aid of the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art) to commemorate their centennial by purchasing a statue of Joan of Arc from Fremiet. Fremiet submitted an "improved" model of his monument, though Thomas Hockley of the Art Association observed little change in it, save for the "figure, which is heightened about 4 or 5 inches." The contract with the sculptor stipulated that there would be only three editions of the statue: the one in the Place des Pyramides, one in Philadelphia, and one in Nancy. A site was selected on the eastern approach to the Girard Avenue Bridge
  • 1889, January 26, founder Thiébaut's bill for casting the statue
  • 1890, November 15, the work was unveiled in Philadelphia with extensive fanfare
  • 1960, the Fairmount Park Art Association gilded the sculpture and relocated it to its present site near the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 25th Street at Kelly Drive

Bibliography

  • http://e-monumen.net/patrimoine-monumental/statue-equestre-de-jeanne-darc-philadelphia/, accessed 15 January 2015
  • 1914 Lami
    Stanislas Lami, Dictionnaire des sculpteurs de l'école française au XIXe siècle, Paris, 1914, I, p. 412
  • 1992 Bach
    Penny Balkin Bach, Public Art in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1992
  • 2013 website
    Audio program by Suzanne Lindsay, Diana Regan, and Judith Shea, museumwithoutwallsaudio.org/interactive-map/joan-of-arc#audio, accessed March 28, 2013

Comment



Museum Without Wallas Audio website, Adapted from Public Art in Philadelphia by Penny Balkin Bach (Temple University Press, Philadelphia, 1992):
Amid the ruins of the Franco-Prussian War, the French government commissioned Emmanuel Fremiet in 1872 to design a monument to Joan of Arc for the Place des Pyramides in Paris. Fremiet had earned a reputation for his work incorporating human and animal motifs in the neo-realistic manner. To develop the memorial to the French heroine, Fremiet studied the design of fifteenth-century French armor and dress in order to convey the figure within her historical context.
In 1889 members of the French community in Philadelphia sought the aid of the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art) to commemorate their centennial by purchasing a statue of Joan of Arc from Fremiet. Fremiet submitted an "improved" model of his monument, though Thomas Hockley of the Art Association observed little change in it, save for the "figure, which is heightened about 4 or 5 inches." The contract with the sculptor stipulated that there would be only three editions of the statue: the one in the Place des Pyramides, one in Philadelphia, and one in Nancy. A site was selected on the eastern approach to the Girard Avenue Bridge, and on November 15, 1890, the work was unveiled in Philadelphia with extensive fanfare. In 1960 the Fairmount Park Art Association gilded the sculpture and relocated it to its present site near the Philadelphia Museum of Art.